Welcome to the BMTInfonet Drug Database

This guide lists many of the drugs bone marrow, stem cell and cord blood transplants patients receive during treatment. It explains why they are used and some, but not allAcute lymphoblastic leukemia., of the possible side effects.

This guide should not be used as a substitute for a detailed discussion with your doctor and pharmacist about drugs you are being given. If you experience any side effect after taking the drug, even if they are not noted below, consult your doctor immediately.

Some of the drugs in this guide are also used outside the transplant setting. The descriptions of the drugs in this guide pertain only to their use in bone marrow, stem cell or cord blood transplantation.

If you are searching for a drug used by transplant patients and survivors that is not in this database, please contact us at drugdata@bmtinfonet.org.

This database was compiled under the direction of pharmacists knowledgeable about transplantation, but should not be construed as medical advice. Consult your doctor for information about how each drug might affect you.

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Amifostine


Trade Names: 
Ethyol®

Possible Uses: 
Protect against kidney damage that may result from cisplatin therapy, and protect against dry mouth associated with head and neck radiation. Investigational use is to protect bone marrow cells from radiation and chemotherapy.

Special Notes: 
Given IV push prior to chemotherapy.

Possible Side Effects: 
Nausea and vomiting, low blood pressure, flushing, sneezing.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Amitriptyline


Trade Names: 
Elavil®

Possible Uses: 
Control depression, promote sleep, control pain that is associated with the nerves.

Possible Side Effects: 
Dry mouth, confusion, constipation, tiredness, dizziness, low blood pressure, heart rhythm changes, blurred vision, difficulty urinating, eye pain, sweating. Rarely, may decrease white blood cell count.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Aprepitant


Trade Names: 
Emend®

Possible Uses: 
to prevent nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy

Special Notes: 
Can be given IV or orally

Drug Interactions: 
Avoid grapefruit juice or grapefuits while taking this medication. This drug may interfere with many drugs, please consult your pharmacist as needed

Possible Side Effects: 
Fatigue, constipation, hiccups, dizziness, diarrhea
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Budesonide EC


Trade Names: 
Entocort EC®

Possible Uses: 
Use to prevent/treat graft vs host disease of the GI tract

Special Notes: 
available as a capsule

Drug Interactions: 
grapefuit juice or grapefruit should be avoided when taking these capsules

Possible Side Effects: 
headache, nausea, diarrhea,
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Epoetin Alpha


Trade Names: 
Epogen®
Trade Names: 
Procrit®

Alternate Names: 
EPO
Alternate Names: 
Erythropoietin

Possible Uses: 
Increase red blood cell counts and hemoglobin after transplant.

Special Notes: 
Medicare has put special restrictions on using this drug when anemia is based on chemotherapy.

Possible Side Effects: 
Pain at injection site, rash, chills, muscle or joint pain, headache, upset stomach, nausea, diarrhea, elevated blood pressure. Rarely, breathing difficulties, chest pain.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Erythromycin


Trade Names: 
E-Mycin®
Trade Names: 
ERYC®
Trade Names: 
Ery-Tab®
Trade Names: 
PCE Dispertab®

Possible Uses: 
Treat or prevent infection.

Drug Interactions: 
Interferes with many drugs metabolized by the liver. May be toxic to the heart when used with astemizole or quinidine.

Possible Side Effects: 
Diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, heartbeat irregularity, rash.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Etoposide


Trade Names: 
Etopophos®
Trade Names: 
VePesid®

Alternate Names: 
VP-16

Possible Uses: 
Chemotherapy drug.

Possible Side Effects: 
Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mouth sores, temporary hair loss, low blood pressure, loss of appetite, dizziness, lightheadedness, yellowing of skin or eyes, breathing difficulties, reversible liver disorder, tightening of lungs, irregular heartbeat, confusion, seizures.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Rasburicase


Trade Names: 
Elitek®

Possible Uses: 
Used to manage elevated uric acid levels in patients with a malignancy. Can be used to prevent elevated levels or treat elevated levels of uric acid.

Drug Interactions: 
no known significant interactions

Possible Side Effects: 
Rash, vomiting, nausea, constipation or diarrhea, mucositis, fever, headache
Last updated on 02/01/2010
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